Identity Theft

| Identity Theft | How ID Theft Occurs | 419 | Advance Fee Fraud | Example 419 |

How a Thief Steals Your Identity

How Identity Theft Occurs

Identity thieves will use a variety of methods and ruses to gain access to your personal information. This can range from impersonating an employee of a company or an official representative.

Other means of acquiring your personal information:

  • Stealing records from an employer.
  • Acting in collusion with an employee of a company or organization which has legitimate access to records.
  • Obtaining credit reports by abusing their employer’s authorized access to credit reports.
  • Impersonating someone such as a landlord, employer, or someone else who may have a legal right to the information.
  • Hacking into a company or organisation which has your records on file, for example, a bank or a Govt. Department.

More common methods of stealing your personal credit card information:

  • Rummaging through your household trash, or the trash of businesses or dumps in a practice known as "dumpster diving."
  • Stealing credit and debit card numbers as your card is processed for a normal transaction by using a special information storage device concealed on their person. The credit card is quickly swiped through a small device, known as a "skimmer". These devices typically store the details of several hundred credit cards. As soon as possible, the "skimmer" device gets uploaded to a computer where other criminals process the information.
  • Stealing wallets and purses containing identification and credit and bank cards.
  • Stealing mail, including bank and credit card statements, pre-approved credit offers, new checks, or tax information.
  • Completing a "change of address form" to divert your mail, and therefore critical information, to another location.
  • Theft of personal information from your home.

Also see Identity Theft - What to do

| Identity Theft | How ID Theft Occurs | 419 | Advance Fee Fraud | Example 419 |

 

 

 

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