Multiple Sclerosis Facts

Facts about Multiple Sclerosis

General Information about Multiple Sclerosis

  •  First Diagnosed in 1849
  • The earliest known description of a person with possible Multiple Sclerosis dates from 14th century Holland
  • Multiple Sclerosis is the most common progressive and disabling neurological condition in young adults
  • Approx 2.5 million people worldwide, have Multiple Sclerosis
  • Around 400,000 people in the United States have Multiple Sclerosis
  • In the UK, approx 70,000 people have the disease
  • Approx 50,000 people in Canada have Multiple Sclerosis
  • Scotland has the highest incidence of Multiple Sclerosis per head of population in the world
  • In Scotland, over 10,500 people have Multiple Sclerosis
  • No virus has ever been isolated as the cause of Multiple Sclerosis
  • Average age of clinical onset is 30 33 years of age
  • The average age of diagnosis is 37 years of age
  • The average time between clinical onset of MS and diagnosis by physicians is 4 - 5 years
  • 10% of cases are diagnosed after the age of fifty
  • In 1936, only 8% of patients were reported to survive beyond 20 years after onset of illness
  • In 1961, over 80% of Multiple Sclerosis patients were reported surviving to 20 years after onset of illness
  • 2002 A patient with Multiple Sclerosis can expect to live to average population life-expectancy minus seven years (mean life expectancy - 7 years)
  • Multiple Sclerosis is five times more prevalent in temperate climates than in tropical climates
  • Multiple Sclerosis affects women much more frequently than men. Approx. 1.7 2:1 in the US and approx 3:2 in the UK
  • The ratio of white to non-white is approx 2:1
  • Gypsies and Inuit's do get Multiple Sclerosis although the incidence rate is much lower than other populations at approx 19 per 100,000
  • Native Indians of North and South America, the Japanese and other Asian peoples have a very low incidence rate of Multiple Sclerosis
  • In identical twins where one twin develops the disease, the likelihood of the second twin developing Multiple Sclerosis is approx 30%
  • The incidence rate for non-identical twins, where one contracts Multiple Sclerosis, is approx 4%
  • The risk of contracting Multiple Sclerosis if a first-degree relative (father, mother, sibling) has the disease, is approx 1% - 3% overall
  • The risk of contracting Multiple Sclerosis if your father has the disease is approx 1 in 100
  • The risk of contracting Multiple Sclerosis if your mother has the disease is approx 1 in 50
  • The risk among the general population of contracting Multiple Sclerosis is approx 1 in 800

See also:

Multiple Sclerosis symptom facts

 

 

Multiple Sclerosis

In 1936, only 8% of patients with Multiple Sclerosis were reported to survive beyond 20 years after onset of illness.

Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis are varied and can occur suddenly, then disappear again just as quickly. There are no specific sets of symptoms applicable to any of the types of multiple sclerosis. Additionally, symptoms of multiple sclerosis tend to vary considerably from one person to another and also to be distant in time... Read More